Spain capital

Madrid, the Spanish capital, officially expresses its interest in hosting a Formula 1 race

Spain’s regional government on Thursday confirmed its interest in hosting a Formula 1 race.

Madrid has confirmed its interest in hosting an F1 race (Courtesy AP)

STRONG POINTS

  • Madrid have confirmed their interest in hosting an F1 race
  • Madrid’s cabinet minister briefed F1 CEO on his commitment to the project
  • The Spanish capital hosted F1 races between 1968 and 1981

Madrid’s regional government on Thursday confirmed the city’s interest in hosting a Formula 1 race.

There are no F1 level tracks in the Spanish capital at the moment. The country already has a race on the F1 calendar in the form of the Spanish Grand Prix which takes place in Barcelona. Despite this, Madrid believe they can open talks with Formula 1 organizers Liberty Media to stage a race in the Spanish capital.

In a letter to F1 CEO Stefano Domenicali, local government minister Enrique Lopez told him the city was committed to the organization and the project. He also said they were ready to sign the appropriate documents to promote the race and provide a great sporting and entertainment spectacle.

“I would like to confirm our commitment to you and to this project, as well as our willingness to sign the appropriate agreements to promote the race and provide a great sporting and entertainment spectacle,” Lopez told Reuters news agency.

Further details of Madrid’s bid were not disclosed and Formula 1 organizers declined to comment on the matter.

Madrid hosted F1 races between 1968 and 1981 at the Jarama circuit. However, the track is outdated and would need a serious upgrade if it were to host a race again.

In 2021, the local government of Morata de Tajuna confirmed that it was looking to build an FIA Grade 1 circuit with the aim of hosting F1 and MotoGP races in the years to come.

Currently, there are 23 races on the F1 calendar. While the sports organizers want to expand the reach of the sport, they are mainly focusing on the regions of Africa and the United States of America.

Recent reports suggest that the Belgian GP is currently at risk of being removed from next year’s F1 calendar.